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The next Holiday program will be held October
4 – 7

    Course outlines

Encouraging Achievement

 Motivating Gifted Underachievers

Differentiation Strategies for Primary Teachers

Differentiation Strategies for Secondary Teachers

Flexible Learning in a Technology Rich Environment

Ten Steps to Success: Managing Successful Programs for the Gifted

Creating HOT Classrooms

Bright SPARKS at our School: Ones school’s model for catering for the gifted and talented

Making it Work: Ideas for Gifted Students and their Teachers

Getting Started: Strategies for the Classroom

What is this Gifted Thing? An Introduction to Gifted Education

Gifted Adolescents in the Secondary Context

Secondary Strategies

"Walking the Talk" of a Gifted and Talented Program – YES it can be done!

 

Encouraging Achievement
Plenary Session
Many gifted students slide by in school, managing to get good marks while putting forth little effort. In this plenary session, we will examine ways to encourage them to embrace academic challenges and choose demanding learning activities instead of the easiest ones. We will discuss how to encourage them to persist through times of failure, take responsibility for their own learning and develop skills in goal setting.

Carolyn Coil

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 Motivating Gifted Underachievers

Frustrated by students who are gifted and have the potential to achieve but somehow do not? This session focuses on those students – our gifted underachievers. We will examine characteristics of underachievers, causes of underachievement and explore numerous practical strategies to motivate these students. Gifted underachievers are an important sub-group we cannot overlook or fail to serve. This session will help you as you work with these students.

Carolyn Coil

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Differentiation Strategies for Primary Teachers

Differentiation is an approach to teaching that gives students different ways to take in and work with information, differing amounts of time to complete the work, different levels of thinking as they work on projects and activities, and different means of assessing what they have learned. In this session, Carolyn discusses a number of differentiation strategies that primary teachers can use with their gifted students. You will leave this session knowing about several teacher-friendly strategies you can use in your classroom immediately.

Carolyn Coil

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Differentiation Strategies for Secondary Teachers

Differentiation is an approach to teaching that gives students different ways to take in and work with information, differing amounts of time to complete the work, different levels of thinking as they work on projects and activities, and different means of assessing what they have learned. In this session, Carolyn discusses a number of differentiation strategies that secondary teachers can use with their gifted students. You will leave this session knowing about several teacher-friendly strategies you can use in your classroom immediately.

Carolyn Coil

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Flexible Learning in a Technology Rich Environment

As the integration of technology into Australian classrooms progresses, many teachers are looking for teaching methods that make effective use of technology. Flexible Learning is a learner-centred approach where students work collaboratively in small groups to achieve outcomes at their own pace and in their own way while utilising the available resources. In this approach the process of learning is valued as much as the outcomes and learners’ different styles, interests, needs and abilities are catered for within each group. The onus is placed on the students to explore and inquire, to reflect and articulate, to collaborate and cooperate, in active tasks requiring enhanced degrees of initiative, motivation and cognitive and physical effort. Technology rich classrooms can assist learning in new and more flexible ways. In such environments the learners can decide, from the options made available to them, how they will achieve the required outcomes.

During this workshop session participants will be exposed to software systems ideally suited to Flexible Learning for Years 7 to 12. eg. Crocodile Clips (Physics, Chemistry and Technology), Interactive Physics, Chem Set 2000, Lake Illuka and more. It is envisaged that participants will take home a suite of flexible learning strategies, applications and examples to use in their own classrooms.

Rod Manson

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Ten Steps to Success: Managing successful programs for the gifted

This session will review the key elements of planning, preparation and implementation that are most likely to ensure that a successful program of extension and enrichment can be established for withdrawal programs, in classrooms, or at school or sub-school level. There are simple and effective guidelines that can be followed to maximise the chances of success. This session is best suited to teachers and administrators looking to extend or establish an effective and well supported program in their school. It will review some of the key issues relating to identification and selection, timetabling, ability grouping, peer relationships and social development, acceleration, programs and models and individual education plans.

John Bailey

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Creating HOT Classrooms

This presentation will highlight a range of strategies used to develop higher order thinking in your classrooms and schools. It is assumed the audience comes with some prior knowledge about who are the gifted and talented children are and how these students can be identified. Initially, profiles of gifted and talented students and the complex issue of underachievement by students of high ability will be covered. Some new and thought-provoking data relating to this will also be shared and discussed. Strategies to motivate and engage high ability students will then be explored. Topics to be covered relate to a differentiated curriculum, critical thinking strategies, creative problem solving and the practical application of CoRT thinking ideas and the implementation of graphic organizers. As a result of what my colleagues and I have observed over a number of years, the examples provided incorporate proven strategies. Participants will be provided with a package containing information and practical examples on all strategies delivered

Jenny Burton

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Bright SPARKS at out School: One school’s model for catering for the Gifted and Talented children

Catering for children who are academically very able was a priority in 1999 at St Simon Peter School, when teachers were aware of just how competent some of the children were. The school found an interested teacher who volunteered to work with the Principal to set up a program to better look after the learning, social and emotional needs of these children. What started out as an exciting challenge has resulted in a different way of helping this group of children.

This presentation looks at

    1. what a school had to do to set up an effective program both in class and withdrawal.
    2. what the co coordinator does to facilitate appropriate learning activities for the identified children.
    3. what role parents play in this program.

Mary Thomas, Allison Prandl and  Richard Cavanagh

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Making it Work: How and Why

Gifted students do learn differently to other students. This session will look at some of the structures that can be used to provide a rich and challenging environment for these students in your class. The need for pre-testing and what to do when you have, the benefits of grouping both in class and with other gifted students in the school and why it is so important to identify your students will be considered. Things to consider when developing a gifted and talented policy will also be touched on.

Derrin Cramer

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Getting Started: Strategies for the Classroom

Students come to our classrooms with a wide array of talents and prior knowledge. This session will look briefly at the characteristics and special learning needs of gifted students before considering how to go about pre-testing and why it is important, when and why grouping is useful and will also give you some strategies to use in the classroom to assist you in accommodating these students.

Derrin Cramer

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What is this Gifted Thing? An Introduction to Gifted Education

This session will introduce participants to the essentials of gifted education. What does it mean to be gifted? What are the characteristics of gifted children? How can I tell if a child "gifted" or "just bright"? How do we identify gifted children? How can we cater for them in the classroom – programs and strategies? What are the simplest and best things I can do? What are the implications of ability grouping? Is acceleration a good idea? How many different forms of acceleration are there? Understanding social and emotional issues and working with parents to develop great relationships.

John Bailey

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Gifted Adolescents in the Secondary Context

There are many models for the provision of gifted education in schools, some of which rely on structured programs and class groupings and others that require teachers to differentiate in their classrooms for students of all abilities. Of concern is the extent to which gifted students are being appropriately catered for to reach their academic potential in the classroom. This presentation will examine the issues when teaching gifted students and look at practical strategies for classroom teachers with either a gifted class or gifted individuals in mixed-ability classes.

Kylie Bice

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Walking the Talk of a Gifted and Talented Program – YES it can be done!

Providing a educational program for gifted secondary students is challenging at the best times !  This presentation will give an insight into actual examples of successful projects, curriculum and school structures/timetabling that has led Murdoch College to become a successful and innovative secondary college in the area of Gifted and Talented Education.  Examples from the four main areas of the curriculum will be given – English, Maths, SOSE, with particular emphasis coming from a Science perspective.  Pauline Charman

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Thinking Ahead Extension Workshops  ABN 50 017 429 348
   Postal address: PO Box 171 Como WA 6952       ph (08) 9474 4594    fax (08) 9474 3462